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Showing posts from October, 2013

Homeowner and Contractor – Remodeling Partners

In any home remodeling project there are two parties involved – the client and the contractor. The client is the homeowner – the one who lives in the home that is to be remodeled and who is paying for all the work that is to be done. It is he who has identified the areas where change is needed. The modifications that are planned are based on his intimate knowledge of the needs of the family that lives in the home and his desire to make everyone as comfortable and happy as possible. The contractor is the one who will actually execute the project and gives the homeowner the home he wants. Based on his experience and qualifications he may not like some of the client’s ideas. And realizing that the client is making a mistake, he may suggest alternatives that, in his experience, will be better for the client and his family. It is here that problems between the two key players in the remodeling project can arise. The Rigid Client No one knows his family, their likes and

Can You Really See Your Home?

In school many of us came across a line from an old poem that said – “Give us the power to see ourselves as others see us.” It’s true that our perception of ourselves is often at variance with how other people perceive us. And we do make efforts to be objective about ourselves as a part of an effort of self-improvement. But where many of us fail is in being able to see our homes as others see them. Familiarity Breeds Contempt Our homes are our most valuable possessions – not just in monetary terms but also in the security they provide us and the quality of life we are able to lead because of them. But it is all too easy to take our homes for granted. We see them every day, day in and day out. We like the little eccentricities that all homes develop over time. We revel in the familiarity that sameness and a lack of change cause. All in all, we begin to believe that comfort and security equals the need to keep things unchanged. But that is not so. Familiarity can lead to